Artist’s Date: Momo (Photo Essay)

Momo Artist Date Catshy

I love little boutiques tucked away in the city, a neighborhood gem filled with new treasures to be discovered. So when a local maker friend suggested Momo as a spot to check out for one of my artist dates, I knew I had a winner.

Located in Japantown on 600 South Jackson Street in Seattle, Momo is carefully curated, carrying indie and handmade brands with a mix of Asian and European influences. A self-described “happy hapa shop”, Momo feels old world and modern at the same time.

I spotted a few of my fave local makers like Thea Starr and Stasia Burrington and found some new faves like The Bowl Maker and Smoking Lily.

I spent a good amount of time browsing this eclectic spot, while chatting with one of the owners about the items that sparked joy and made me smile. If you love supporting independent artists and makers, I highly recommended heading to Momo during your next visit to Seattle.

buddha statue

Serene buddha statue and Japanese iron tea pots give a Zen vibe that I dig

Enamel pins by Stasia Burrington

Enamel pins by Stasia Burrington (I took a kitty home with me!)

Origami mobile hanging from a red-painted branch

Origami mobile hanging from a red-painted branch

Lucky Cups by The Bowl Maker

Charmingly illustrated Lucky Cups by The Bowl Maker

Precisely folded flowers made of vintage kimono fabric by Thea Starr

Precisely folded flowers made of vintage kimono fabric by Thea Starr

Much-photographed curio cabinet filled with fabulous kawaii and vintages treasures and lots of Spam cans

Much-photographed curio cabinet filled with fabulous kawaii and vintages treasures and lots of Spam cans

Original painting alongside greeting cards

Original painting by Roger Shimomura alongside colorful greeting cards

More art and clothing - I brought home a beautiful dress by Smoking Lily.

More art and beautiful clothing.

My new favorite summer dress by Smoking Lily that I bought at Momo that day.

DETAILS:

Momo Seattle
600 S. Jackson Street
Seattle, WA
Website: http://momoseattle.com/

The Artist’s Way: Artist Date

This blog post is part of my series on The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron. If you missed my earlier posts, start here.

An artist date is a block of time, perhaps two hours weekly, especially set aside and committed to nurturing your creative consciousness, you inner artist. — Julia Cameron, The Artist’s Way

What is an artist date?

The second basic tool of The Artist’s Way is the weekly artist date. With the same care you may extend to a romantic date or your child’s play date with a friend, the artist date is a pre-planned excursion that you take every single week. To be clear, this is a solo date. Just you and your inner artist. No friends, spouses, children or significant others allowed.

One of my first artist dates: a solo hike to a waterfall.

Cameron warns the reader that one’s “killjoy side” will do anything to get out of committing to an artist date.  No money or no time are common excuses. She says this resistance is a fear of intimacy with ourselves.

For me, this tool has proven harder to execute than the morning pages. As a single mom who shares custody with my kids’ dad 50%, I am often alone, left to my own devices. So I feel a bit indulgent to take myself on a date in addition to all the “me time” I get.  But this is probably just my resistance talking!

Go play!

Artist dates are designed to nurture your artist child. With this intention in mind, your creativity will be sparked and inspiration may strike. Choose activities or places that will delight you or intrigue you or spark your curiousity. It can take the form of a long walk on the beach. A leisurely browsing at an antiques store. A trip to the local art museum. Or having a solitary picnic in the park. It could be a trip to the art supply store.  Anything your inner artist may enjoy is fair game.

My most recent artist date included a trip to an historic Seattle teahouse at the Panama Hotel.

My most recent artist date included a trip to an historic Seattle tea house at the Panama Hotel.

Some artist dates that I have planned include a solo hike on a local trail overlooking a waterfall, a tea house date with my journal and camera by my side and a trip to the local library where I browsed children’s picture books for inspiration.

Sending and receiving

Cameron says that the morning pages combined with the artist date is a two-step process, two-directional process of out then in. Through the morning pages you are sending out your dreams, hopes and discontent. Through artist dates, you are receiving insight, inspiration and guidance.

I love the give and take of that. It is dance you are doing with the Universe.  You express what you’re feeling and thinking every day. And through a weekly excursion with yourself, you open up to the creative possibilities which can then inform your creative work. Cameron calls it filling the inner well of your artist.

 

More ideas for artist dates

Artist Date explained by Julia Cameron

101 Artist Date Ideas

52 Ideas for Artist Dates

A Shy Crafter’s Guide to Selling at Craft Fairs

shy-crafter-craft-fair-catshycrafts

My first-ever craft fair at the EtsyRain Handmade Holiday Show in Seattle, 11/2012.

This was first published on the School House Craft blog. But with holiday craft shows on the horizon, I thought it would be a great time to re-post (with updated links) for all my shy crafters out there! Enjoy!

With Netflix streaming on my computer, my favorite mug filled with coffee and my messy piles of felt and embroidery thread and yarn around me, I am in my own little cocoon of happy relaxation when I sit down to make my felt creations for my creative business, Catshy Crafts. I can update my social media sites, photograph my work or post a new listing on Etsy, all without leaving my happy place.

But sooner or later, I know, in order for me to have a successful business, to grow my business, I must venture out in the world. Make connections. Meet people (potential customers and collaborators). Show my work. For this (once) painfully shy person, this has always been a challenge for me.

When I had the opportunity to sell at my very first craft fair a few years ago, I couldn’t pass it up (even though it scared me half out of my mind). I knew that vending at a craft fair was the next logical step for my business. It was a chance to sell to a local audience, meet other crafters and yes, overcome some of that shyness that has been hindering me from doing things all my life. How did I do it?

Here are my top five tips for selling at your first craft show (from a shy crafter’s perspective).

  1. Do Your Research. A big part of my anxiety about selling at my very first craft fair was the fear of the unknown. What would my booth look like? Would I sell anything? Would I be able to talk with my customers? How much inventory should I bring? Would it be worth it?

Answering most or all of these big questions beforehand will save you a lot of stress in the end. To find out more information about craft fairs, search the Etsy Blog or start posting questions on the Etsy Forums. You can also try a local meet-up group like Seattle HandmadeKari Chapin’s CreativeLive class (I was an in-studio audience member, a whole other shy-busting experience) has a great segment on a designing booth display. Pinterest is also a great resource for getting ideas about booth displays.

ucu-july2014-oh-hello-friend

Fun way to repurpose a muffin tin by Oh Hello Friend. Urban Craft Uprising, Seattle 7/2014.

  1. Prepare Yourself. Armed with your new knowledge about craft fairs, start preparing for the big day as soon as possible. Being prepared is a great way to get over some of your anxiety. Here are a few areas to focus on.
    • Booth Display. Set up a mock booth display in your living room or garage. Measure out your space. Make sure you have ways to display your items in an eye-pleasing way. And don’t forget to carve out a space where you will be sitting or standing. Pinterest is a great place to find inspiration and ideas.
    • Make a checklist of all the things you will need for the big day. Don’t leave anything out. From tables and chairs to money to make change to snacks to signage for your booth, make sure you have everything you need. For a sample checklist of items you may need, check out: https://blog.etsy.com/en/2012/what-to-bring-to-a-craft-fair/
    • Prepare icebreakers or questions you can ask a visitor to your booth. I don’t know about you, but small talk is not one of my strengths. Taking a few minutes to think about some questions or icebreakers for your booth visitors could help alleviate some of that small talk anxiety. After all, she is taking time to visit your booth, make her feel welcome with some friendly conversation. For example, compliment her on something she is wearing OR ask her how she’s likes the craft fair so far. If she is looking at a particular item in your booth, tell her something interesting about the piece or what inspired you. But if your mind goes blank or you get a little tongue-tied, a hello and smile never hurts. And who knows, maybe she is shy too!
wooden tray display at craft show

Some vintage Catshy Crafts designs on display at my first craft show.

  1. Set Goals. Having some goals in mind at the start of fair is a good way to keep you focused and stop you from focusing on how nervous you are. I like to set a few goals for myself that are relatively easy to achieve. This will get the ball rolling and motivate you to accomplish even more.
Queen Anne Artist's Trunk Show, 12/2015

Queen Anne Artist’s Trunk Show, 12/2015

  • For example, one goal could be: sell at my first craft fair. Check! Remember, this is your first craft fair. You get points for doing the prep work and just showing up!
  • Other manageable goals could be:
    • Greet at least 5 people who visit your booth.
    • Introduce yourself to at least 3 other craft vendors.
    • Smile at 5 people who walk by your booth.
    • Of course, you can also have goals of how much you sell, but sometimes that can put extra pressure on you. But if you’re up for the challenge, go for it! But remember, craft fairs are not just a way to make sales. Promoting your shop, meeting potential customers, networking with other crafters and getting out of your comfort zone are just a few of the awesome benefits of craft fair vending.
One of my displays.

One of my displays made of a vintage picture frame and cork board.

  1. Get Support from Your Friends and Family. This one could be a tricky one if you are shy, but trust me it is worth the effort. Ask a friend, spouse/significant other or family member to be your booth buddy for the day or at least a few hours. Having company makes the whole experience a whole lot less scary. Also, remember to tell all your friends and family (as well as your customers and followers) that you are selling at your first craft fair and invite them to visit you! You never know who will stop by.
ucu-july2014-friend

My friend Hannah visiting me at Urban Craft Uprising in Seattle, 7/2014.

  1. Reward Yourself. It is important to give yourself a lot of credit for taking this big step. Even non-shy crafters get nervous about selling their work, so the fact that you are doing it despite your shyness is worth celebrating. Yay for you! And don’t wait until the day is over to start celebrating. Every time you achieve one of your goals, take a moment to enjoy your awesomeness! You deserve it.

ADDITIONAL LINKS:

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/catshycrafts/i-love-craft-booths/

Catshy Crafts Blog (my original blog posts about my first craft fair experience):

http://catshycrafts.com/2013/01/10-tips-on-surviving-your-first-craft-show/

http://catshycrafts.com/2013/02/designing-a-craft-booth-display-with-thrifted-finds/

http://catshycrafts.com/2012/11/i-did-it-etsyrain-handmade-holiday-show-2012-recap/

Catshy Crafts is coming to West Elm Seattle!

Seattle lovelies, please join me at a special pop-up at West Elm Seattle on Saturday, July 30 from 12-3 PM. I will be there with my adorable hoop art (like these brand-new cuties) plus brand-new hair accessories including hair clips and headbands!

West Elm Seattle Pop Up
2201 Westlake Ave, Seattle, WA
Saturday, July 30
12-3 PM
P.S. For those of you not in the Seattle area or unable to come out for the pop-up, I will be sure to post lots of pics on my Instagram feed so you won’t miss all the fun :)

Follow me at @catshycrafts

Renegade Craft Fair Comes to Seattle!

RCF-Seattle-Catshy-Crafts-8-2015-Entrance

Held in Hangar 30 of Magnuson Park (site of former  Naval Air Station) on August 1 and 2, this was Renegade Craft Fair’s auspicious debut in Seattle.

Even though Urban Craft Uprising has long been the end-all, be-all of craft fairs in Seattle (I vended there two summers ago – fulfilling one of my creative business dreams, yay!), I was so excited when Renegade Craft Fair announced it was coming to the Emerald City. I wasn’t able to sell here (full disclosure: I was rejected. wump wah), but OF COURSE, I came out to support my fellow handmakers and crafters. Also on the agenda — check out booth displays for ideas; interact with makers to help me better serve my own customers. A sizzling summer day spent doing market research plus shopping all rolled into one. Days like these makes it awesome to be handmade business!

I was solo that day  – my kiddos were spending the day with their dad and my usual craft fair buddy was incapacitated by a craft show injury (true story!). So I was able to browse at leisure, make a flower crown, absorb the vibe of the show and chat it up with some vendors, which for me — a recovering shy person but proud introvert — is a big accomplishment.

Here is my photo essay of my first-ever visit to a Renegade Craft Fair.  Enjoy! (All photos were taken by me, Cathy Pascual (unless otherwise noted). Feel free to share or pin my photos just please link back to this original post. Thanks so much!)

I’ve been following Julie Ann for years (to me, a quintessential Etsy success story), so I was happy to meet her in person! I took home three of her irreverent greeting cards with me!

A regular of Urban Craft Uprising, Foamy Wader was a familiar face at RCF. Love her delicate and sea-inspired jewelry and display!

A regular of Urban Craft Uprising, Alexa of Foamy Wader was a familiar face at RCF. Love her delicate and sea-inspired jewelry and displays!

RCF-Seattle-Catshy-Crafts-8-2015-air-plants

Dinosaur terrarium mason jar and air plant terrariums by MakersKit appealed to my DIY side.

Embroidered jewelry by An Astrid Endeavor

Beautifully graphic and colorful hand-embroidered jewelry by An Astrid Endeavor.

Hand-thrown porcelain ceramics by Land Bird.

Hand-thrown porcelain ceramics by Land Bird. Love the mix of illustrations and bold color.

This booth was delightful and full of these whimsical wool felt birds by Up in Flight.

This booth was delightful and full of these whimsical wool felt birds by Up in Flight.

Love how Sires Eyewear told the story of their glasses with a three-dimensional comic strip complete with comic book style half-tone dots. And the award for most creative and stylish display goes to Sires Eyewear.

Love how Sires Eyewear told the story of their glasses with a three-dimensional comic strip complete with comic book style half-tone dots. And the award for most creative and stylish display goes to Sires Eyewear.

Bunny Bear Press had a striking blue-painted pegboard display. I'm a big fan of Adina's letterpress cards and stationery!

Bunny Bear Press had a striking blue-painted pegboard display that definitely stood out among the other booths. I’m a big fan of Adina’s beautiful letterpress cards and stationery and so is West Elm Seattle.

These pillows stopped me in my tracks because of the cuteness factor alone! Thank you Thousand Skies for even let me plump and rearrange the pillows before I snapped the photo!

These pillows stopped me in my tracks because of the cuteness factor alone! Thank you Thousand Skies for even let me plump and rearrange the pillows before I snapped the photo!

The name alone made me want to stop at this booth. But I fell in love this world map necklace! So clever. And Jessica and her fiance were super-friendly.

The name alone made me want to stop at this booth: Oh So Antsy. But I fell in love this world map necklace! So clever. And Jessica and her fiance were super-friendly. Turns out Jessica and I have attended a couple of the same creative business conferences (School House Craft and Craftcation). #smallworld

I thought these color me greeting cards by Monorail Studio were brilliant!

I thought these “color me” greeting cards by Monorail Studio were brilliant! A great way to personalize your card.

Stepping into this booth felt like walking into a brick and mortar boutique. Love the name too! Such Sweet Tierney.

Stepping into this booth felt like walking into a brick and mortar boutique. Love the name too! Such Sweet Tierney.

Vintage books. Hidden storage. Retro library cards as tags? Yes, please and thank you, Afterword.

Vintage books. Hidden storage. Retro library cards as tags? Yes, please and thank you, Afterword.

I also stopped by Knucklekiss’s booth of modern handcrafted jewelry (I have had my eye on her knuckle rings forever!) And don’t you love that shop name? According to her website, it means “a punch in the kisser, but also a peck on the hand.” p.s. I borrowed this photo from Angela’s Instagram feed – because my photo turned out blurry. Too busy chatting it up with Angela :)

RCF-Seattle-Catshy-Crafts-8-2015-goat-and-kettle

I wish (oh how I wish!) that I had taken a photo of Goat and Kettle’s entire set-up. It was a stand-alone booth that you could walk around. It was right at the entrance so it got tons of foot traffic and his branding, display and product (hand-forged jewelry from antique keys and hardware) were so on point! Favorite “booth” of RCF!

Photo by Goat and Kettle.

P.S. I contacted Justin of Goat and Kettle and he sent me a this photos of his display. Thanks Justin!

My first ever flower crown made with wire, floral tape, fresh flowers and the help of the volunteers from La Fleur Kitchen.

After I made the rounds a few times, I circled back to the entrance and made my first ever flower crown. A soothing processing of twisting, wrapping, contemplating flower and foliage choices, I made this out of wire, floral tape, fresh flowers and the help of the volunteers from La Fleur Kitchen. If you’re curious what it looked like on my head, you can click over here to my Instagram feed @catshycrafts.

More souvenirs from my RCF visit: business cards, my flower crown, and photo booth shots.

More souvenirs from my RCF visit: business cards, my flower crown, and photo booth shots arranged on my bulletin board at home. Business pictured (top to bottom, left to right): La Fleur Kitchen (flower crown). Oh So Antsy. Julie Ann Art. Bunny Bear Press. Up in Flight. Land Bird. Pocket Square Clothing. Julie Ann Art. Afterword. Foamy Wader. Thousand Skies. Monorail Studio.Magnolia Photo Booth.

(all photos taken by Cathy Pascual//Catshy Crafts (unless otherwise noted). Feel free to share just please link back to this original post. Thanks so much!)